THIS MARK MATTERS – DFA

DFA This Mark Matters Intro Graphic

“This mark matters – DFA”, so says the DFA management slogan.

IT CERTAINLY DOES MATTER!

The management of DFA continuous to destroy U.S. family dairy farms, our safe and secure national milk producing infrastructure and rural communities in it’s pursuit of the maximum quantity of the cheapest milk possible.

DFA is the largest U.S. dairy farmer member owned co-op based on revenues and assets.

Per Rabobank, of the top 20 dairy companies in the world in 2018, DFA was number 6 in sales.

In 2018, DFA grew milk production by 2.5 billion pounds while LOSING 532 family member dairy farms. (Hoard’s Dairyman, Oct. 10, 2019 issue)

The loss of U.S. licensed dairy farms between 2009-2019 was 20,745 (Progressive Dairy, April 19, 2020 issue) with DFA losing the most of all U.S. co-ops.

Yet, Rick Smith, DFA CEO writes on Nov. 12, 2019 that “We remain committed .. to preserving the family farm for generations.” REALLY?

DFA dairy farmer co-op members are some of the most poorly paid U.S. dairy farmers. Nearly all DFA co-op “profit” goes to DFA management and/or DFA joint venture partners, NOT dairy farmer co-op members.

According to Genske, Mulder & Co., LLP, CPA, DFA has earned a 10 year average 18% profit for it’s management and 75+ joint venture partners, much of which has come from “below cost” raw milk prices paid to DFA dairy farmer members.

DFA management see their job ONLY as getting, filling and shipping the maximum orders for milk and/or milk products for management benefit by any means possible, sacrificing dairy farmer member’s milk price to do so.

DFA management has failed tragically to perform it’s fiduciary duties and responsibilities to benefit and preserve co-op dairy farmer membership with a fair, sustainable, profitable milk price.

If DFA is to preserve the family farm for generations, as stated by Smith above, DFA dairy farmer owner members need to change THEIR DFA management personnel and/or policies and adopt NDPO’s co-op
management policies which requires all DFA members to work “cooperatively” and share in a pro-rata, across-the-board, proportional milk reduction, as required, to continuously balance DFA’s milk intake with profitable demand for member milk, yielding a sustainable profitable milk price from the marketplace for most members and thereby preserve as many of the remaining DFA family farms as possible.

Mike Eby
NDPO Board Member